WHY TAKE ADVANCED PLACEMENT CLASSES?

Advanced Placement Courses are the #1  determining factor in predicting the success of high school students once they enter the college of their choice. What Advanced Placement classes provide for a high school student is a rigorous classroom environment and college level material, with the added bonus of an end of the year examination that can earn the a high school student potential college credit based on their performance on an AP exam. Scores of 3 or better, (with 5 being the highest) can exclude an incoming freshmen in college from having to take "survey classes", because they have already proven their proficiency based on an AP class. That means that students can begin to take more challenging classes in college, and do not have to pay for, and take, certain courses since they have already received credit based on AP scores. This can mean a tremendous savings for a college freshmen.

Getting Ready for May, every day!!!

Most significantly, AP classes on a high school transcript shows prospective target schools that this student is ready for the challenge of college level work because they have already been exposed to it at the high school level. Hence, a high GPA without any AP classes does not mean as much; a student has not demonstrated "strength of schedule." Taking the most challenging classes in high school, (AP classes) means more than a higher GPA with only general level classes. If a college is going to invest their time and money (in the form of grants and scholarships) they want to be sure that their "investment" - an incoming freshmen - will not fold under the pressure of college level work.  

There is no debate about the benefits of a rigorous high school education:

  • The intensity of a student’s high school curriculum is the single best predictor of college degree completion.--Department of Education analyses authored by Clifford Adelmam, Answers in the Tool Box (1999) and The Toolbox Revisited (2006)
  • After controlling for student characteristics, research has found a consistent positive association between curricular intensity and the following: student test scores (Attewell and Domina 2008), high school graduation (Schneider, Swanson, and Riegle-Crumb 1998), college entry (Long et al. 2012), type of college entry (Attewell and Domina 2008), college grades (Klopfenstein and Thomas 2009), college graduation, (Adelman 2006; Attewell and Domina 2008), and wages (Altonji 1995; Rose and Betts 2004).
  • In a national survey of sixteen- to twenty-five-year-olds who left high school without graduating, 47 percent of respondents reported that they dropped out because their classes were not interesting. Two-thirds of those respondents said that they would have engaged more in school and tried harder if more had been asked of them (through higher academic standards and other demands). J. M. Bridgeland, J. J. Dilulio Jr., and K. B. Morison, The Silent Epidemic: Perspectives of High School Dropouts (Washington, DC: Civic Enterprises, March 2006).

We also know that Advanced Placement courses are the critical components of a rigorous high school curriculum, and predictors of success in college:

  • Students who successfully participated in one or more AP exams and courses significantly out-performed their non-AP peers, earning higher college GPAs and being more likely to graduate in four years or less. Hargrove and Dodd (2007)
  • Students earning a three or higher on A.P. exams are three times more likely to earn a college degree than students who do not pass, and African-American and Hispanic students who pass an A.P. exam are four times more likely to earn a college degree than those who do not pass, according to the study--National Center for Education Accountability
  • 82% of students say AP classes are more worthwhile than regular courses. --College Board

Unfortunately, not all students have access to a rigorous curriculum, specifically Advanced Placement courses:

  • Low-income students are twice as likely as others to attend schools without a full array of AP courses, according to a June 2013 study by the Education Trust and Equal Opportunity Schools. (from the LA Times)
  • African American and Latino students are less likely than their white peers to take an AP course, take an AP test, and pass the AP test. Specifically, White students make up 55 percent of the students enrolled in grades 9–12, yet they represent 59 percent of the students enrolled in at least one AP course, 63 percent of the students taking at least one AP exam, and 68 percent of those passing at least one AP exam.
  • African American students make up 17 percent of the students enrolled in grades 9–12, yet they represent 10 percent of the students enrolled in at least one AP course, 9 percent of the students taking at least one AP exam, and 5 percent of those passing at least one AP exam.
  • Latino students make up 21 percent of the students enrolled in grades 9–12, yet they represent 19 percent of the students enrolled in at least one AP course, 16 percent of the students taking at least one AP exam, and 13 percent of those passing at least one AP exam.--CRDC (Civil Rights Data Collection at www.ed.gov)

A Message from the Principal about AP at FDA

Video is embedded here.

Here are the AP classes offer presently at FDA, along with video clips from these classes "in action

AP Computer Science

  • Course Profile + Curriculum Guide  
  • Video Clip Inserted Here
  • Video Clips of student testimonials here.

AP English Literature

  • Course Profile + Curriculum Guide
  • Video Clip Inserted Here
  • Video Clips of student testimonials here.

AP Physics

  • Course Profile + Curriculum Guide
  • Video Clip Inserted Here
  • Video Clips of student testimonials here.

AP Micro Economics

  • Course Profile + Curriculum Guide
  • Video Clip Inserted Here
  • Video Clips of student testimonials here.

AP Statistics

  • Course Profile + Curriculum Guide
  • Video Clip Inserted Here
  • Video Clips of student testimonials here.

AP Spanish Literature

  • Course Profile + Curriculum Guide
  • Video Clip Inserted Here
  • Video Clips of student testimonials here.

AP Calculus

  • Course Profile + Curriculum Guide
  • Video Clip Inserted Here
  • Video Clips of student testimonials here.

AP European History

  • Course Profile + Curriculum Guide
  • Video Clip Inserted Here
  • Video Clips of student testimonials here.

AP Biology

  • Course Profile + Curriculum Guide
  • Video Clip Inserted Here
  • Video Clips of student testimonials here.

AP Chemistry 

  • Course Profile + Curriculum Guide
  • Video Clip Inserted Here
  • Video Clips of student testimonials here.

FORMER AP EURO STUDENTS TELL THEIR STORIES:

These students below have sat where you are sitting. I would highly suggest that you take some time and view these testimonials. They have a lot to say about their high school careers, as well as their experiences in college and beyond. Click on a name and listen to their story:  

  1. Jonathan Brown: AP Euro 10th Grade; FDA Class of 2013; Johns Hopkins University

  2. Jazly Liriano: AP Euro 10th Grade: FDA Class of 2012; Harvard Class of 2016

  3. Ricardo MaturanaAP Euro 10th Grade: FDA class of 2007; Columbia Graduate of 2011; Med Student presently - SUNY Stonybrook

  4. Prince Antwi: AP Euro 11th Grade; FDA Class of 2010; Harvard Class of 2014

  5. Patrick Ojimba: AP Euro 11th Grade; FDA Class of 2012; Brown University Class of 2016

  6. Lorena Rodriguez: AP Euro 10th Grade; FDA class of 2009; Amherst College Class of 2013

  7. Javaun Francis: AP Euro 11th Grade; FDA Class of 2011; Boston University Class of 2015

  8. Daoud Nsangou: AP Euro 11th Grade; FDA Class of 2010; City College of New York 2014

  9. Brian Flores: AP Euro 11th Grade; FDA class of 2009; Carnegie Mellon University Class of 2013

  10. Gisel Bello: AP Euro 12th Grade; FDA class of 2009; University of Rhode Island Class of 2013

  11. Jahque Bryan Gooden: AP Euro 11th Grade; FDA Class of 2012: Carnegie Mellon Class of 2016

  12. Grace Ce-Eya: AP Euro 11th Grade; FDA Class of 2012; American University Class of 2016

  13. Evelin Henriquez: AP Euro 10th Grade; FDA Class of 2009; MIT Class of 2013

  14. Jasmine Mark: AP Euro 11th Grade; FDA Class of 2012; Brooklyn College Class of 2016

  15. Dwight Robinson: AP Euro 11th Grade; FDA Class of 2012; University of Buffalo Class of 2016

  16. C'Ara McCrea: AP Euro 11th Grade; FDA Class of 2012; Syracuse University Class of 2016

  17. Ashley Iguina: AP Euro 10th Grade; FDA Class of 2012; Wellsey College Class of 2016

  18. Alexis Iguina: AP Euro 11th Grade; FDA Class of 2012; Hunter College Class of 2016  

  19. Kamila Nixon: AP Euro 11th Grade; FDA Class of 2012; Vassar Class of 2016

  20. Peter Herron: AP Euro 11th Grade; FDA Class of 2012; Eastern University Class of 2016

  21. Rawlin Rosario: AP Euro 10th Grade; FDA Class of 2011; University of Pennslyvania Class of 2015

  22. Wilfredo Castillo: AP Euro 11th Grade; FDA Class of 2012; Syracuse University Class of 2016

  23. Sofia Mohamed: AP Euro 10th Grade; FDA Class of 2007; Boston College Class of 2011; Teaching Presently

  24. Dessaure Davis: AP Euro 10th Grade; FDA Class of 2012; Amherst College Class of 2016

  25. Shareen Shaw: AP Euro 10th Grade; FDA Class of 2010; Lehman College Class of 2014

  26. Joan Leslie: AP Euro 10th Grade; FDA Class of 2009; Dartmouth College Class of 2012

  27. Fatoumata Makadji: AP Euro 11th Grade; FDA class of 2013; Buffalo State class of 2017

  28. Brittany Nixon: AP Euro 10th Grade; FDA class of 2013; Emory University Class of 2017

  29. Cristelle Permalan: AP Euro 11th Grade; FDA Class of 2013; Ithaca College Class of 2017

  30. Bria McDaniel; AP Euro 11th Grade; FDA Class of 2013; FIT Class of 2017

  31. Sadat Donkor; AP Euro 10th Grade; FDA Class of 2011; Boston College Class of 2015

  32.  Kayla Loperna: AP Euro 11th Grade; FDA Class of 2013; City College Class of 2017

  33. Andrea Iguina; AP Euro 11th Grade; FDA Class of 2013; City College Class of 2017